Monkeys, macaws and turtles have recently reminded us why we should be thankful.

Published on November 27, 2013

For the first time in decades, a troop Capuchin monkeys has been spotted on the RIESTER Reserve.

For the first time in decades, a troop Capuchin monkeys has been spotted on the RIESTER Reserve.

Recent news from the RIESTER Foundation left all of us at RIESTER feeling thankful. Thankful we were able to make an impact. Thankful we have some amazing clients who make it possible for our Foundation to do its share of good.

On the RIESTER Reserve in Islita, Costa Rica, the good news was heralded by a troop of Capuchin monkeys. These were the first Capuchins seen on the Reserve in decades. And they’ll soon have company, as the Scarlet Macaw was recently reintroduced to the area.

Another milestone on the Reserve has been our new native plant nursery. Managed by Reserve caretaker, Norman Quiros, the nursery not only provides native species for the Reserve, but also for the people who call Islita home. The nursery has taken root and is already a local success.

Just a mile down the winding, unpaved road from the Reserve is Corozalito Beach. This half mile stretch of pristine beach is where the RIESTER Foundation supports PRETOMA, the international organization that protects the Olive Ridley Turtle. Poaching continues to be a threat to the Olive Ridley, but by mid-November, more than 1,500 turtles were recorded nesting at Corozalito. For the Olive Ridley Turtle – and all of planet Earth – those are numbers to celebrate.

At RIESTER, we are thankful that we are able to maintain the Foundation and support its efforts. None of it would be possible without the people we serve each and every day. Thank you.